Zaletel, Ivan

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orcid::0000-0002-4841-788X
  • Zaletel, Ivan (2)
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Author's Bibliography

Hippocampal BDNF in physiological conditions and social isolation

Zaletel, Ivan; Filipović, Dragana; Puškaš, Nela

(2017)

TY  - JOUR
AU  - Zaletel, Ivan
AU  - Filipović, Dragana
AU  - Puškaš, Nela
PY  - 2017
UR  - https://vinar.vin.bg.ac.rs/handle/123456789/1664
AB  - Exposure of an organism to chronic psychosocial stress may affect brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) expression that has been implicated in the etiology of psychiatric disorders, such as depression. Given that depression in humans has been linked with social stress, the chronic social stress paradigms for modeling psychiatric disorders in animals have thus been developed. Chronic social isolation in animal models generally causes changes in hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis functioning, associated with anxiety-and depressive-like behaviors. Also, this chronic stress causes downregulation of BDNF protein and mRNA in the hippocampus, a stress-sensitive brain region closely related to the pathophysiology of depression. In this review, we discuss the current knowledge regarding the structure, function, intracellular signaling, inter-individual differences and epigenetic regulation of BDNF in both physiological conditions and depression and changes in corticosterone levels, as a marker of stress response. Since BDNF levels are age dependent in humans and rodents, this review will also highlight the effects of adolescent and adult chronic social isolation models of both genders on the BDNF expression.
T2  - Reviews in the Neurosciences
T1  - Hippocampal BDNF in physiological conditions and social isolation
VL  - 28
IS  - 6
SP  - 675
EP  - 692
DO  - 10.1515/revneuro-2016-0072
ER  - 
@article{
author = "Zaletel, Ivan and Filipović, Dragana and Puškaš, Nela",
year = "2017",
abstract = "Exposure of an organism to chronic psychosocial stress may affect brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) expression that has been implicated in the etiology of psychiatric disorders, such as depression. Given that depression in humans has been linked with social stress, the chronic social stress paradigms for modeling psychiatric disorders in animals have thus been developed. Chronic social isolation in animal models generally causes changes in hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis functioning, associated with anxiety-and depressive-like behaviors. Also, this chronic stress causes downregulation of BDNF protein and mRNA in the hippocampus, a stress-sensitive brain region closely related to the pathophysiology of depression. In this review, we discuss the current knowledge regarding the structure, function, intracellular signaling, inter-individual differences and epigenetic regulation of BDNF in both physiological conditions and depression and changes in corticosterone levels, as a marker of stress response. Since BDNF levels are age dependent in humans and rodents, this review will also highlight the effects of adolescent and adult chronic social isolation models of both genders on the BDNF expression.",
journal = "Reviews in the Neurosciences",
title = "Hippocampal BDNF in physiological conditions and social isolation",
volume = "28",
number = "6",
pages = "675-692",
doi = "10.1515/revneuro-2016-0072"
}
Zaletel, I., Filipović, D.,& Puškaš, N.. (2017). Hippocampal BDNF in physiological conditions and social isolation. in Reviews in the Neurosciences, 28(6), 675-692.
https://doi.org/10.1515/revneuro-2016-0072
Zaletel I, Filipović D, Puškaš N. Hippocampal BDNF in physiological conditions and social isolation. in Reviews in the Neurosciences. 2017;28(6):675-692.
doi:10.1515/revneuro-2016-0072 .
Zaletel, Ivan, Filipović, Dragana, Puškaš, Nela, "Hippocampal BDNF in physiological conditions and social isolation" in Reviews in the Neurosciences, 28, no. 6 (2017):675-692,
https://doi.org/10.1515/revneuro-2016-0072 . .
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Chronic stress, hippocampus and parvalbumin-positive interneurons: what do we know so far?

Zaletel, Ivan; Filipović, Dragana; Puškaš, Nela

(2016)

TY  - JOUR
AU  - Zaletel, Ivan
AU  - Filipović, Dragana
AU  - Puškaš, Nela
PY  - 2016
UR  - https://vinar.vin.bg.ac.rs/handle/123456789/1088
AB  - The hippocampus is a brain structure involved in the regulation of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and stress response. It plays an important role in the formation of declarative, spatial and contextual memory, as well as in the processing of emotional information. As a part of the limbic system, it is a very susceptible structure towards the effects of various stressors. The molecular mechanisms of structural and functional alternations that occur in the hippocampus under chronic stress imply an increased level of circulating glucocorticoids (GCs), which is an HPA axis response to stress. Certain data show that changes induced by chronic stress may be independent from the GCs levels, opening the possibility of existence of other poorly explored mechanisms and pathways through which stressors act. The hippocampal GABAergic parvalbumin-positive (PV+) interneurons represent an especially vulnerable population of neurons in chronic stress, which may be of key importance in the development of mood disorders. However, cellular and molecular hippocampal changes that arise as a consequence of chronic stress still represent a large and unexplored area. This review discusses the current knowledge about the PV+ interneurons of the hippocampus and the influence of chronic stress on this intriguing population of neurons.
T2  - Reviews in the Neurosciences
T1  - Chronic stress, hippocampus and parvalbumin-positive interneurons: what do we know so far?
VL  - 27
IS  - 4
SP  - 397
EP  - 409
DO  - 10.1515/revneuro-2015-0042
ER  - 
@article{
author = "Zaletel, Ivan and Filipović, Dragana and Puškaš, Nela",
year = "2016",
abstract = "The hippocampus is a brain structure involved in the regulation of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and stress response. It plays an important role in the formation of declarative, spatial and contextual memory, as well as in the processing of emotional information. As a part of the limbic system, it is a very susceptible structure towards the effects of various stressors. The molecular mechanisms of structural and functional alternations that occur in the hippocampus under chronic stress imply an increased level of circulating glucocorticoids (GCs), which is an HPA axis response to stress. Certain data show that changes induced by chronic stress may be independent from the GCs levels, opening the possibility of existence of other poorly explored mechanisms and pathways through which stressors act. The hippocampal GABAergic parvalbumin-positive (PV+) interneurons represent an especially vulnerable population of neurons in chronic stress, which may be of key importance in the development of mood disorders. However, cellular and molecular hippocampal changes that arise as a consequence of chronic stress still represent a large and unexplored area. This review discusses the current knowledge about the PV+ interneurons of the hippocampus and the influence of chronic stress on this intriguing population of neurons.",
journal = "Reviews in the Neurosciences",
title = "Chronic stress, hippocampus and parvalbumin-positive interneurons: what do we know so far?",
volume = "27",
number = "4",
pages = "397-409",
doi = "10.1515/revneuro-2015-0042"
}
Zaletel, I., Filipović, D.,& Puškaš, N.. (2016). Chronic stress, hippocampus and parvalbumin-positive interneurons: what do we know so far?. in Reviews in the Neurosciences, 27(4), 397-409.
https://doi.org/10.1515/revneuro-2015-0042
Zaletel I, Filipović D, Puškaš N. Chronic stress, hippocampus and parvalbumin-positive interneurons: what do we know so far?. in Reviews in the Neurosciences. 2016;27(4):397-409.
doi:10.1515/revneuro-2015-0042 .
Zaletel, Ivan, Filipović, Dragana, Puškaš, Nela, "Chronic stress, hippocampus and parvalbumin-positive interneurons: what do we know so far?" in Reviews in the Neurosciences, 27, no. 4 (2016):397-409,
https://doi.org/10.1515/revneuro-2015-0042 . .
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